Category: Healthy Living

Chia Pudding

Chia Pudding

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 cup of liquid*
  • 1 tbsp sweetener*

Make it how you want it!

Chia pudding is an amazing dish because not only is it a powerhouse of nutrients and protein, it’s also delicious and incredibly easy to make! One of our favourite things about it is that you can make Chia pudding with almost any combination of ingredients, and you modify the texture until it’s perfect for you.

So the point is that this is more a guideline than a strict recipe. You can start with this if you’ve never made chia pudding before, and once you’re comfortable with it, fool around! Experiment! Discover your own amazing and unique combinations! If you want some other ideas, check out this great list of recipes from our friends at Prana.

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in an airtight container, ideally one with a handle. For the liquid, almond milk is a good starting point, and for the sweetener you can use honey or maple syrup or agave – or anything else you want!
  2. Shake it up! Shake it until it’s well mixed, or until you’re bored of shaking. Whatever feels right.
  3. Let it rest in the ‘fridge for at least 30m. If you feel like shaking it again during the rest period, that’s great. If not, that’s cool too!
  4. That’s all! If it’s too thick, add some liquid. If it’s too thin, add some more seeds. Try jazzing it up with some nuts, or fruit chunks, or anything else you want. The world is your chia seed!

Chia Pudding keeps for about 5 days in the fridge, so you can make large portions and prep for a week at a time!

Post-Holiday Recovery Guide

Imagine if the New Year came complete with an all expenses paid trip to a luxurious spa, at which your primary obligations are subjecting yourself to every possible detoxifying treatment whilst sipping smoothies. Not in the cards? Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered.

These are our top 3 picks for post-holiday recovery. Whether you ate too many cookies, enjoyed too many toasts or caught your toddler’s bug… stop by our Natural Apothecary and we’ll get you sorted.

 

Himalaya Liver Care

These vegetarian capsules are formulated to support the healthy daily detoxification and cell regeneration of your liver. If your head still hurts from ringing in the New Year, you’ll be happy to know it also works to eliminate “acetaldehyde”, the toxic byproduct of alcohol intake.

 

 

Flora Elderberry Crystals for Children and Adults 

Elderberry can be used preventatively, or at the onset of a cold or flu to shorten its duration. It’s used in herbal medicine to help relieve symptoms like cough, sore throat and catarrh of the upper respiratory tract (mucus discharge and buildup). Try this kid-approved recipe for an Elder-Power Smoothie and toast to your health!

 

Elder-Power Smoothie

Makes 1 smoothie

Ingredients:
2 tbsp. Flora Flax Oil
4 tbsp. organic Greek yogurt
3 g Acerola Powder
5 g Elderberry Crystals
1 cup frozen blueberries or raspberries
1 small banana
1 cup almond or coconut milk
Combine all ingredients, blend until smooth

Original recipe can be found here.

 

Genuine Health Advanced Gut Health Probiotic

Chock full of probiotic strains – 15 of them to be exact – specifically chosen to mimic human gut flora, this probiotic aids in food intolerances, allergies, skin issues, bloating, weak digestion, low immunity and brain fog. With 60-80% of our immune system located in our guts (yup!), the state of our digestive system is a key factor in our overall health. These shelf-stable vegan capsules are great for travelling or if you are on-the-go. So go – with your gut, that is!

Organic and Natural Foods Industry Glossary of Terms

The Sweet Potato - crop of lettuce

If you’re new to the world of natural and organic foods and farming, this list will help give you the vocabulary to make informed food choices.

Farming

Organic Agriculture: Organic farming is a strictly regulated farming practice that doesn’t allow for the use of synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and chemical fertilizers. Organic farming:

  • Uses non-GMO (genetically modified) seeds;
  • Employs environmentally-conscious farming practices;
  • Helps create and maintain nutrient-dense land;
  • Works with natural climate rhythms;
  • And protects the water supply.

Lands also need to be certified organic, which is a process that typically takes a minimum of three years. During this process, organic standards are employed in farming practices so that the land can be certified.

In North America, labels from Canada Organic, USDA National Organic, Pro-Cert, or Quality Assurance International let you know the product has been certified as organic by an official third party organization recognized by the Canadian government.

Transitional Farming: Obtaining full certification as an organic farm is a commitment of both time and money. Crop farms interested in pursuing certification for land that had previously been used to grow conventional crops, must first apply for transitional certification. A “transitional” crop is grown on land that’s in the process of converting from conventional to organic. Certified transitional farms use organic standards in their farming practices and need to do so for a minimum of three years for organic certification. Before the three-year mark, any crops grown on the field are considered “transitional” crops and cannot be sold on the organic market.

Biodynamic Agriculture: Similar to organic farming principles, biodynamic agriculture also draws on insights made by Rudolph Steiner, a mid-20th century German philosopher. Today the biodynamic movement encompasses thousands of regenerative gardens, farms, ranches, orchards, and vineyards in a wide variety of climates, ecological contexts, and economic settings.  

Hydroponics: Hydroponics, a subset of hydroculture, is a method of growing plants without soil. Instead of soil, plants are grown in a mineral nutrient solution in water. Hydroponic nutrient solution can be made from fish waste, duck manure, or normal nutrients (fertilizer). Hydroponically grown plants are housed in plastic reservoirs in greenhouses.

Aquaponics: Refers to a system that combines aquaculture (the raising of aquatic animals like fish, snails, or prawns in tanks) with hydroponics (cultivating plants in water) in a symbiotic environment. In normal aquaculture, waste from the animals raised accumulates in the water, increasing toxicity. In an aquaponic system, water from an aquaculture system is fed into a hydroponic system in which waste is broken down by bacteria and utilized by plants as nutrients. The water is then recirculated back to the aquaculture system.

Permaculture: A combination of agriculture and social design principles that work together to support natural ecosystems.  The three core tenets of permaculture are:

  • Care for the earth: Provision for all life systems to continue and multiply.
  • Care for the people: Provision for people to access those resources necessary for their existence.
  • Return of surplus: Reinvesting surpluses back into the system to provide for the first two principles. Sometimes referred to as the Fair Share ethic to reflect that each of us should take no more than what we need before we reinvest the surplus.

The focus of permaculture is not on separate elements but rather on relationships created among them by the way they are placed together. Permaculture design seeks to minimize waste, labour, and energy input by building systems with a high level of synergy. To this end, permaculture designs are constantly evolving.

Local: Local produce, meat, and seafood are fresher, healthier, and have less impact on the environment because they’re harvested when ready and travel less of a distance to reach your plate. Moreover, it keeps dollars invested in local communities.

The definition for local in use by The Sweet Potato is less than 200 km, though no standard definition exists.

Clean: We use clean to mean free from synthetic chemicals including hormones and antibiotics, fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides. Clean does not mean a product has been certified organic, but it is Non-GMO and raised and produced responsibly.

GMO Genetically Modified Organisms

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are organisms that have had their DNA altered or modified through genetic engineering usually to introduce a trait not seen naturally in the organism. Where foods are concerned, many cash crops like soy, corn, canola, potatoes, alfalfa, squash, beets, and flax have been genetically modified to resist pathogens or herbicides or to change their nutrient profile.

With concerns related to food safety, regulation, labelling, environmental impact, research methods, and the fact that some genetically modified seeds are the intellectual property of corporations, the public are increasingly demanding organic and certified Non-GMO foods. At the Sweet Potato all our produce is grown from non-GMO seeds. As well, our full bulk and bakery line is GMO-free!

 

Animal Welfare

Cage-Free: Eggs produced by cage-free hens describes hens that may or may not be permitted outside but do roam freely. Eggs from hens that only roam indoors may be labelled ‘barn-roaming’, ‘barn’, or ‘cage-free’.

Free-range: Animals that are raised ‘free-range’ can roam freely outdoors for at least part of the day. This term can apply to meat, eggs, or dairy farming.

Organic Meat: Organic meat comes from animals that have been raised without treatment of hormones or antibiotics and have been fed a diet free from anything grown from GMOs and with synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides. As well, minimum space allowances and access to the outdoors are part of criteria that need to be met. Organic meat can be fully traceable from flock to farm and is certified by an independent third party.

 

Trade

Fair Trade: What started as a social movement that advocates for the payment of higher prices to exporters of commodities from developing countries to developed countries has become a fully certified industry. Fair trade practices seek to promote greater equality where inequality exists as the starting point.

It promotes sustainable development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers in developing countries. Fair trade is grounded in three core beliefs:

  • That producers have the power to express unity with consumers;
  • That world trade practices that currently exist promote the unequal distribution of wealth between nations;
  • And lastly, that buying products from producers in developing countries at a fair price is a more efficient way of promoting sustainable development than traditional charity and aid.

With the certification of the industry, producers now need to apply for and pay to join a certifying body. Some criticism has arisen around how this prevents access for the most marginalized producers.

Direct Trade: Advocates of direct trade practices promote direct communication and price negotiation between buyer and farmer/producer. There is no precise definition for the term and no third-party certification. The term was coined for the coffee industry but is now applied to other growers such as cocoa, nuts, and handicraft artisans. The term was born out of frustration with the limitations of Fair Trade certification, mainly that certification is too onerous and costly to farmers and artisans who must qualify and apply for the very certification meant to offer them protections.

Acai Bowl

Acai Bowl

The-Sweet-Potato-Acai-Bowl

Ingredients

  • 1 pack frozen acai, either sweetened or unsweetened
  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1 big handful berries
  • 1 big handful different berries (we like using blueberries and strawberries)
  • 1 small handful of oatmeal
  • 2 tbsp coconut flakes
  • 2-3 tablespoons hemp seeds
  • 1/3 cup coconut milk

Directions:

  1. Take the frozen acai out of the freezer, and set it aside while you do the rest of the prep, so it has the chance to that out a little tiny bit.
  2. Wash the berries, and set aside half of each kind.  If you are using strawberries or other large berries, cut the set-aside half into bite-sized pieces.
  3. Combine the coconut milk, the frozen banana and the hemp seeds in a blender, and blend on high until smooth.
  4. Add to the blender the slightly-thawed acai, and half of the berries, and blend it until smooth, scraping the sides as necessary.
  5. Serve immediately, topped with the remaining berries, oatmeal, and coconut flakes.

Enjoy!

Our Banned Ingredient List

The What: Buying Practices

From our first days in the Farmer’s Market at High Park, we’ve been clear about our buying standards. We value the trust you put in us to nourish your family and we really want you to feel at ease when you shop here. From our very first days till now, our produce has always been GMO-free.

We’ve always tried to source produce that’s both organic and local first. When that’s not available we look to our trusted local, clean farmers and then to certified organic farms further afield. And we always work to ensure our labeling is clear and direct so you know exactly what you’re buying.  

Over the years as we’ve grown as a company, we’ve been lucky to add entire departments and a crew of buyers to our team. It’s important for us to ensure our team is well equipped with current data to make the best decisions about what foods to stock on our shelves.

 

The Project: Make a List We Can Stand Behind

To this end, we set forth on a project to analyze a bunch of ingredients we haven’t historically let in our store to ensure there was enough reason not to. We want these sorts of regular analyses to become part of how we do business because so many of the banned ingredient lists floating around out there are woefully out-of-date. This information is helpful only insofar as it’s kept current.

We want to set the standard for best practice in the industry when it comes to our buying policies. And we wanted to test certain claims. So we looked hard at the available research and we formalized a BIG list of ingredients we won’t let in our store. This is our Banned List.

 

Here’s Why

We’re not scientists, we’re not pretending to be, and for lots of the stuff on our list there’s no firm consensus in the scientific community. After all, these things have been approved for consumption by Health Canada. But when a number of studies echo similar results, we listen. When the allowable safe “dosage” for certain ingredients consistently decreases over time, that’s a red flag (we’re looking at you, artificial food colourings). We’re not interested in just abiding by legal requirements. We’re interested in holding ourselves to a stricter standard.

When it comes to human health, the well-being of farmers and producers, and harmful ecological practices, we want to err on the side of safety. Ingredients you find on our list are there because they satisfy one of three criteria:

 

1) Research suggests it’s detrimental to human health;

2) Research suggests farming or processing the ingredient is harmful to workers;

3) Research suggests the environmental impact of producing the ingredient is harmful.

 

Take butter flavour as an example, diacetyl. This is a fine ingredient to ingest as far as we know. It’s often included in microwave popcorn that you buy at conventional stores, and used to create a rich butterscotch flavour in some alcoholic beverages.

But there’s increasing evidence that the way in which it’s processed is potentially hazardous to the workers who handle it, causing serious lung disease when inhaled. In fact, the US National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety has issued this exact warning while the California legislature seeks to bans the use of diacetyl entirely.

 

The Banned List
Take a look at our list of of banned ingredients and please be in touch if you have follow up questions or concerns. We’d be pleased to discuss our rationale and the studies we looked at to arrive at our list.

Banned Ingredients 1p PDF for web – June 2017